Short Reflections on the Strike: Here Again

UCU Cardiff sign at picket lineOrdinarily, today would be a teaching day. Qualitative Research Methods with a small group of MA students. Instead, I’ve been standing outside the entrance to my building, picketing with my university colleagues.

I won’t belabour the details of why: it’s been written about in thorough detail, with helpful videos to explain the issue. I also won’t spend a lot of time in this post explaining why I’m a part of it, though this blog post puts things very well.

What gurns me, and what I will talk about here, is how shitty it is to be here again.

The tl;dr version of events is that the universities are worried about the value of the pension. They do not believe they have sufficient funds in the kitty to honour their commitments to workers in the worst case scenario – the one where everything folds up shop tomorrow and no one is paying any more contributions into the scheme.

I don’t believe this is an appropriate measure, however, as the likelihood of all these universities suddenly stopping all activity is low to the point of being laughable. In the real, business as usual case, the scheme is healthy and everyone’s contributing as they should.

And I’ve been here before. Pension valuations were one of the big pressures that forced the CBC to cut 800 jobs in 2009. As I’ve written before, I was one of them. It’s what led me into academia.

It’s therefore galling to be arguing against the universities’ plans to rearrange pensions and hurt relations with their employees. I’ve already been here. But, having been here, in a different sector and a different country, I’m under no illusions about the exceptional quality of academic lecturers. We’re workers, like any other, providing a service with our skills that is partly paid for now, with our monthly paycheques, and partly compensated in the future, with a pension to secure our living when we have gotten too old to offer those skills anymore.

Having uprooted my family, changed my life trajectory, invested time and money in retraining, and now gotten only a precarious foothold in this industry, it’s rotten to be defending my corner once again. And yet, here I am.

Heartsick Condolences and the Inevitable Deja-Vu

"You are the chump"

Fellow former CBC journo Dave Atkinson got the same tap on the shoulder in 2009.

Last week, I was at the inaugural conference for BRAIS – the British Association for Islamic Studies. It’s one of the initiatives assisted by the centre that’s funding me, and it brought together philosophers, historians, language scholars, political scientists, and social researchers like myself, all of whom touch on Islam and Muslims in the work that we do. I presented a paper as part of a panel on Scottish Muslim experiences organised by the Muslims in Britain Research Network; I was also busy as a volunteer support; it was a chance to “network” – crucial for a grad student on the cusp of completing the thesis and looking for “the next step;” and I took it upon myself to live-tweet Aaqil Ahmed’s keynote presentation. Ahmed is the head of religion and ethics for the BBC, and therefore a pretty important guy in the media environment in which I work and conduct my research. I’m not going to say it was the most important two days of my academic career so far, but it was exemplary of both the work I’m doing and the point I’ve arrived at.Michael Munnik presenting at BRAIS 11 April 2014

Thing is, five years ago, I would not have imagined this is where I would be. Continue reading